Thursday, May 13, 2010

Goodbye, Georgey

 
Georgey earlier this morning

Do you remember Georgey? He was the crab that had dealt with so much stress in his life, I wondered if he would ever last a year with me.

Yesterday before leaving for the HQ party, I checked all my crabs as I always do. I noticed that Georgey was in their pool frothing clear bubbles. This seriously alarmed me because none of my crabs had ever done that, plus Georgey was totally intense on it and not budging.

Later on after I changed their drinking water, I noticed that he started to walk around but ever so slowly. I knew something was up and so I checked online crab forums and info sites to determine what I should do to this little guy. According to the Hermit Crab Association, bubbling is mostly caused by dehydration and overheating:
Most crabs bubble brown fluid when stressed and rough handling is often enough to provoke it. (rough handing is classified as arid conditions below 65% RH, temperatures exceeding 33C {92F}, where no cover is present)

The brown fluid is regurgitated from the fore gut and bubbles in the exhalant respiratory air streams, which exit close to the mouth. The fluid contains surfactants (A substance composed of lipoprotein that is secreted by the alveolar cells of the lung and serves to maintain the stability of pulmonary tissue by reducing the surface tension of fluids that coat the lung.) which cause the bubbling. This effort does further damage the gills and they will die up to 3 days from the time they do.
Please note that the excerpt above explains the bubbling of BROWN fluid. Other sites say that if the bubbles are CLEAR then it should be okay. On the contrary, I think bubbling in general is NOT a good sign. Falling off of legs are supposed to follow the bubbling episode and true enough, Georgey lost a leg this morning. Dropping legs is connected to fluctuating temperatures which is what we are currently experiencing in Metro Manila. Below is a picture of Georgey's leg in the food dish beside the pear.


Oh sadness. So I just transferred the little guy to the ISO tank so he could go in peace.


 And at 2:00 PM today, Georgey passed.

Rest in peace, Georgey :'(

Sigh. I am terribly sad. Georgey was my first crab to die of natural causes, the others seem fine now as I transferred their terrarium to the coolest part of our living room. I have yet to decide where to bury the poor guy, my Mom and sister are awfully sad too.   

The last time I lost a pet was way back in 1999 when my hamster of 2 years, Caramel, died of natural causes as well (their life spans reach only a max of 2 years). I brought Caramel with me, even to the beach where we always spend our vacations. Caramel even had a family and survived several plane rides to Mindanao. 

I love my pets, they are like family to me. I cannot imagine how life will be once P-nut, my beloved Chihuahua of 6 years, passes on to dog heaven. Coincidentally, P-nut is turning 7 years on May 23. He is as strong and as stubborn as ever, but please include him in your prayers. Dog life spans usually reach only 10 years, sometimes 13 if you're lucky.

2 Comments:

  1. How will you know if your crabbie died? Thank you.

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    Replies
    1. Hi Icy!

      Usually the crab is dead when it doesn't move anymore, smells like rotten fish or well, looks lifeless. You have to check to make sure that it is really dead, otherwise you might just be looking at their old shell and your crab might have molted.

      Prior to dying, Georgey also lost some limbs which usually happens when crabs are stressed. Losing limps is also a sign that the end is near, unless the crab miraculously recuperates as in Spark's case (http://www.ilovehermitcrabs.com/2011/10/can-hermit-crabs-grow-their-limbs-asap.html).

      Please visit www.iLoveHermitCrabs.com for more crab stories and FAQs :)

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